Sydney’s own Lake Pedder Campaign

$1 BILLION dam project to flood Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

Keith Muir, Director, Colong Foundation for Wilderness

There is a very good reason that large dams have not been built in NSW for the last 30 years. Dams, by their very nature, have devastating impacts on the natural environment. Inundation of protected areas, water starvation of downstream ecosystems and cold-water pollution of waterways are just some of the many environmental impacts dams have.

Creature Feature: Lace Monitor, Goanna

Samantha Newton, Executive committee member, National Parks Association of NSW
The Lace Monitor (Varanus varius), or Lacie as it’s commonly known, is a large, tree-dwelling, lizard that often surprises bushwalkers by suddenly appearing halfway up a tree, or walking through a campsite. The surprise comes from their large size (1-2 m) which is perhaps magnified by their long tail, and often seemingly stealthy movement. Lace Monitors are carnivorous, and can move fast.

Biodiversity is threatened in New South Wales

Dr John Benson

This article was published online on 19 September 2017 in the blog Pearls and Irritations

The New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) was the first of its type in Australia. Established by a Liberal government, its lyrebird emblem became world-renowned. But the Service is not valued by the present Government and now faces grave uncertainty.

The Wild Wild Inner West

Margot Law, NPA Citizen Science Officer

Imagine a city where native animals flourish, helping to control feral vermin and even looking after your garden! Well, perhaps Sydney isn’t that far away from making this a reality. In recent years, we’ve seen native species like long-nosed bandicoots (Perameles nasuta), powerful owls (Ninox strenua) and native pollinators starting to reclaim their city.

To My Darling

My Dearest Darling,

From the first time that I sat beside you in 1974, I have always loved you. Your peacefulness, your beauty, your generosity, your power. Gradually I learnt your history and came to know the people who have loved you since time began. The more I got to know you, the more I loved you – through the good times and the bad, through the floods and the dry times. From Wiimpatja I learnt a little bit about the customs of caring for you and understanding you. These customs had ensured that you nourished people with water, food, shelter, warmth in winter, coolness in summer, celebrations, stories and meaning.