Will the Coalition degazette the Murray Valley National Park and cement its anti-environment reputation?

Oisín Sweeney, Senior Ecologist, National Parks Association of NSW

This article first appeared on John Menadue – Pearls and Irritations website on 25 September 2017.

This article follows on from Ross McDonnell’s article on the Murray Valley National Parks in issue 61 (3) Spring 2017

Sydney’s own Lake Pedder Campaign

$1 BILLION dam project to flood Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

Keith Muir, Director, Colong Foundation for Wilderness

There is a very good reason that large dams have not been built in NSW for the last 30 years. Dams, by their very nature, have devastating impacts on the natural environment. Inundation of protected areas, water starvation of downstream ecosystems and cold-water pollution of waterways are just some of the many environmental impacts dams have.

Degazetting the Murray Valley National Park would be a low water mark for conservation in NSW

None of our natural wonders appear to be safe from the “development” agenda of the NSW Government. The aim of the National Party to return the Murray Valley National Park, the largest area of continuous red gum forest in the world, to state forest for logging shows how far we have fallen in the protection of nature.

Will the Basin Plan save the Darling River?

Bev Smiles, President, Inland Rivers Network

The Murray Darling Basin Plan, gazetted in November 2012, has a budget of $13 billion to fund a new direction for water management and water sharing in one of the world’s largest river basins. It is the most expensive natural resource management project in the nation.

Forests not Woodlots

Margaret Blakers, director of the Green Institute and a long-time environmentalist

Rosemary Beaumont’s article is timely. The Great Southern Forest is part of a larger picture which will see the fate of over 6 million hectares of Australia’s most loved native forests decided between now and 2021. Either they will be handed to the logging industry for another 20 years, effectively to become woodlots, or the federal government will resume environmental oversight and give the forests a chance.

Why Are National Parks Important