Leave No Trace

Leave No Trace

Dr Helen Smith, Activitives Officer, National Parks Association of NSW

Nothing is more heartbreaking than seeing natural areas trashed by current and previous visitors. Particularly when we all work so hard to protect natural places through our campaigns at the NPA. But protecting natural areas isn’t just about being loud through media coverage and campaigns. It also comes down to setting a good example to others when we’re out exploring.

We know we’re preaching to the converted here, but it’s worth refreshing the Leave No Trace Principles so you can clearly articulate them and their importance to others. Leave No Trace Australia is an organisation dedicated to inspiring and promoting responsible use of the outdoors through research, partnerships and education. The Leave No Trace guidelines describe best practice for visiting natural areas. They consist of seven principles:

A Better Future for Public Native Forests

It’s possible with diverse community support

Dr Oisín Sweeney, Senior Ecologist, National Parks Association of NSW

Last year the National Parks Association NSW (NPA) released a report that showed how, despite being a noble attempt to marry some pretty uncomfortable bedfellows (logging, conservation and recreation), the Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs) have failed in all of their high level aims. From protecting the environment to maintaining long-term economic stability and jobs in forest industries, the RFAs have not worked. A new approach is desperately needed writes Oisín Sweeney.

Koalas are at the centre of a perfect storm. The species is slipping away | Kevin Evans | Opinion | The Guardian

Australia is one of the worst performing countries in terms of protecting its ecoregions. Koalas are a litmus test for conservation of a habitat in crisis

Source: Koalas are at the centre of a perfect storm. The species is slipping away | Kevin Evans | Opinion | The Guardian

A Plan To Protect Kosciuszko’s Water Catchments

Graeme L. Worboys, Adjunct Fellow, Fenner School of Society and Environment, Australian National University

Large numbers of the Wild Horse, a farm-animal escapee, are severely impacting the water catchment wetlands of the Australian Alps, including right across Kosciuszko National Park. In 2014, 35% of the Alps wetlands had been damaged. These high mountain wetlands are the very heart of the headwater catchment sources for our mightiest rivers, the Murray, Murrumbidgee and the Snowy and regrettably they are also a preferred grazing area for these heavy stock animals. Numbers of Wild Horses have grown from about 2,000 to more than 6,000 in just 11 years and they are causing great damage to the catchments. The NSW Government, in response to these threats has launched, in May 2016, a draft Wild Horse Management Plan for consultation … a plan, amongst other things, to protect the water catchments.

Why Are National Parks Important