The bits that didn’t burn -NSW’s unburnt parks as biodiversity arks

Gary Dunnett, Executive Officer, National Parks Association of NSW

Fire has played a central role in human history, an essential part of the tool kit that enabled a naked ape to spread across the globe. We are all linked by our individual experiences of fire, from an infant’s wonder to the shared pleasure of sitting around a campfire. Fire has influenced human history far beyond our individual experiences. In Australia, more so than anywhere else in the world, fire has shaped the landscape, vegetation communities and species. The arrival of humanity on this continent coincided with a sharp increase in fire frequency and a broad trend towards more fire tolerant vegetation types.

Reversing declines of Australian forests should be a national priority

High rates of forest clearing in Queensland and Western Australia—with NSW set to follow—act in concert with intense native forest logging as an all-out assault on Australian forest environments says the National Parks Association of NSW (NPA).

It’s easy to become blasé about forests when living on the eastern seaboard of Australia, because most settlements (including the large urban areas of Sydney and Brisbane) are fringed by forests and daily life puts millions in contact with forests and forest animals like king parrots and kookaburras.

Threatened Species Commissioner calls for cats to be removed from among the pigeons

The National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) welcomes Threatened Species Commissioner Gregory Andrew’s call to keep cats indoors to protect wildlife.

“This is a bold intervention, and one that would certainly help to reduce predation from cats on our native wildlife—particularly in urban and peri-urban areas” NPA CEO Kevin Evans said.

“For this to be really effective though, it needs to be part of a bigger picture plan. All levels of government need to be committed and it needs to be properly funded.”