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Book Review: The Curious Life of Krill


Author: Stephen Nicol | Reviewer: NPA book club

‘The Curious Life of Krill’ by Stephen Nicol was the book we discussed at our zoom meeting in March. We were all quite fascinated and had greatly enjoyed reading the book. It is hugely informative, well written and a good size.

Below questions are only a tiny example of all the extraordinary facts about krill we learnt, and the book dives into other important areas such as the protection of Antarctica and associated politics.

Verdict: a must read. – Enjoy!

Feral Horse Poster – Cynthia Breheny’s work and imagination

Di Thompson, member, NPA NSW and NPA ACT

At the end of the first COVID year (December 2020), Gary Thompson and I visited Canberra’s Institute of Technology (CIT) exhibition of students’ major artworks.  We were there to see a unique poster designed and assembled by a friend and colleague, Cynthia Breheny with a special environmental message.  

Halt, defend yourself, stand: Protecting Burragorang before and after Warragamba Dam

Taylor Clarke, Gundungurra

My name is Taylor Clarke. I am a proud Gundungurra woman, my people are the Bidjiwong people of Burragorang Valley. We are the custodians of lands spanning approximately 11,000 kilometres, bordering Tharawal, Darug, Wiradjuri and Ngunawal nations. Much of our Country is now within what is known as the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area (GBMWHA), and Sydney’s Water Catchment around Warragamba Dam.

Guide to the Robertson Rainforest

Robertson Rainforest is listed as a Threatened Ecological Community under the Biodiversity Conservation Act and as Critically Endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act

Robertson Rainforest historically covered much of the basalt plateau surrounding the town of Robertson. Today less than about 20% of this unique rainforest type remains, with most remnants highly fragmented and disconnected making long-term survival of this rare vegetation community and the animals that rely on them a high priority for protection and connectivity efforts by landowners, environmental groups and the local community.

New Koala SEPP Commences in NSW – But Worse is Yet to Come

Cerin Loane, Senior Solicitor, Environmental Defenders Office

This article originally appeared on EDO’s website (edo.org.au) on 8 April 2021 and has been reprinted with permission.

Following its announcement on 8 March 2021 (see our earlier update), the NSW Government has now made State Environmental Planning Policy (Koala Habitat Protection) 2021 (Koala SEPP 2021). It commenced on 17 March 2021, while Koala SEPP 2020 continues to apply to some rural zones.  

Koala Protection in NSW: how our most valued native animal is abused

Gary Dunnett, Executive Officer, NPA NSW

The koala populations of NSW were decimated during the first quarter of the 20th century by commercial hunting for the fur trade.  Many local populations were pushed towards or into extinction.  We’re now nearly a hundred years since the peak of commercial hunting and many areas, especially in the south-eastern corner of the State, remain largely bereft of koalas.  In other places, especially those with limited accessibility, such as the military lands in southwestern Sydney and the dense forests of the northeast, koala populations staged major recoveries after the cessation of commercial harvesting.   

Unfortunately, that recovery had largely come to an end by the 1970s as habitat loss from coastal development, agricultural clearing and forestry, along with increasing mortality due to collisions with motor vehicles, dog attacks and infectious diseases, all took their toll on local koala populations.  The result is that, as we approached 2021, the NSW Upper House Inquiry into the future of koalas in NSW concluded that, without significant change in the way we protect koalas and their habitats, the species will become functionally extinct (ie incapable of maintaining viable local populations) in NSW within the next 50 years.