Latest News

Re-Wilding in Review

Gary Dunnett, Executive Officer, NPA NSW

Re-wilding emerged on the Australian conservation scene atop John Wamsley’s feral-cat skinned hat.  Despite all the attention on killing cats and foxes, the core concept of rewilding is gentle simplicity itself – remove the competitors to native species, stop them from coming back, then give nature the chance to take care of itself. 

Why then, more than fifty years later, are we still grappling with whether re-wilding has a place in the NSW Protected Area Network?  I suspect the answer lies in our continuing unease about whether the environmental impacts of introducing hard barriers into ‘natural’ landscapes outweigh the environmental benefits of controlling feral species and re-introducing locally extinct wildlife.  

Threats to Wollemi National Park: from 8 new coal mining leases

David Hufton, member, NPANSW

The NSW Government has announced exploration and development of new coal mine leases in State Forests bordering Wollemi National Park, a UNESCO area.

As part of the NSW Government 2020 Coal Strategy eight new areas for coal exploration have been identified, four on the borders of Wollemi National Park.

Link to map: Areas in NSW coal regions available and excluded from future coal exploration and mining

The negative impacts to biodiversity from forest loss and coal mining would be catastrophic to the ecosystems and environmental values of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area (Wollemi Section).

Vale Bob Salt

The Friends of Berowra Valley are sad to report the death of founding chair, Robert ‘Bob’ Salt OAM on Easter Monday at Bowden Brae Nursing Home.

Bob was largely instrumental in having the Berowra Valley Regional Park declared the Berowra Valley National Park in 2012. He contributed important sections to the Guide to Berowra Valley Regional Park published in 2004 and was involved in the production of the Walking Guide to Berowra Valley National Park in 2014.

Submission Guide Snowy 2.0 Transmission Connection

The NSW Government has exhibited an Environmental Impact Statement to build massive transmission towers through Kosciuszko National Park. The proposed ‘overhead’ connection links the new Snowy 2.0 powerstation with the electrical grid. 

The National Parks Association of NSW is demanding that the Snowy 2.0 connection should be by underground cables rather than on overhead lines.  Underground cables have far lower environmental impacts, are less vulnerable to fires and storms, are recognised as international best practice for environmentally sensitive sites, and avoid setting a terrible precedent for future connections through our precious national parks. 

This guide will assist everyone who cares about the future of Kosciuszko National Park to make a submission demanding an underground connection for Snowy 2.0


SUBMISSIONS CLOSE: Easter Monday 5/4/2021

The EIS for the Snowy 2.0 Transmission Connection can be viewed at https://www.planningportal.nsw.gov.au/major-projects/project/10591
We recommend using the Planning Department Major Projects  online form to make your submission.  You’ll need to create an account with the NSW Department of Planning to be allowed to make a submission.  
If you have any problems please email your written submission to Sharniec@npansw.org.au before the closing date and we’ll ensure it is forwarded to the NSW Department of Planning


It is always best to make a submission in your own words.  You can be as specific or as general as you like, and remember there is no need to be an expert to offer a comment.  Issues you might like to address include:

  • State your connection to Kosciuszko National Park, whether as a visitor, bushwalker, camper, climber, cross country skier or someone passionate about the environment. 
  • Describe how the destruction of this part of Kosciuszko National Park will impact your visitation and spending in the local area. 
  • Note that our collective responsibility is to protect National Parks for future generations, not for the commercial advantage of electricity companies. 
  • State your strong objection to any new overhead transmission lines through national parks, including Kosciuszko National Park. 
  • Note that the last major transmission line to be constructed in a NSW National Park was in the 1970’s, more than half a century ago.  
  • Overhead transmission lines are no longer acceptable in environmentally sensitive locations such as national parks.  Underground cables have less impact, last longer and are a far better option.
  • Since 2006, the Kosciuszko National Park Plan of Management (POM) has required that any additional transmission lines in the Park be located underground. 
  • It is outrageous that the NSW Government is looking to overturn this very reasonable policy so that TransGrid and Snowy Hydro Corporation can use a cheaper, outmoded and environmentally destructive option, ie. overhead lines.   
  • The proposed overhead lines are far more visually intrusive than any of the existing single-circuit lines in the Park, with two sets of  massive 75-metre-high towers traversing eight kilometres of Kosciuszko over a cleared  swathe up to 200 metres wide. The towers and lines will be visible over an astonishing 250 square kilometres of wilderness. 
  • One square kilometre of national park will be permanently cleared, decimating the habitat of threatened species such as Yellow bellied glider, Squirrel Glider, Eastern Pygmy Possum, Gang Gang Cockatoo, Powerful Owl, Masked Owl and the Boorolong Frog.  
  • If such species aren’t safe in a national park where can they possibly survive?
  • The Environmental Impact Statement is totally inadequate and should be withdrawn. If resubmitted it should propose an underground connection, in compliance with the POM and in keeping with world-best practice. 
  • If the EIS is approved this NSW Government will be the first to condone overhead  transmission lines in a National Park for 50 years – a tragic legacy, especially when there are viable underground alternatives.
  • Kosciuszko National Park is already under incredible stress from the bushfires which decimated much of the park in 2019-20, to the advancing effects of climate change. This area is already extremely fragile and cannot afford further destruction. Overhead transmission lines are completely unnecessary and inflict totally unnecessary permanent damage to our beloved Kosciuszko National Park.

Dendrobium Mine Expansion Refused

Dr Peter Turner, NPA Mining Projects Science Officer

To the great relief of many, the Independent Planning Commission (IPC) has refused the proposed expansion of the Dendrobium coal mine, south west of Sydney. Approval would have continued the highly damaging mining introduced in 2013, from 2024 to 2048.  The refusal constitutes a reality check for the mining company, and the Department of Planning. The Department had been the consent authority since a Commission of Inquiry approved the mine in 2001.