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The bits that didn’t burn -NSW’s unburnt parks as biodiversity arks

Gary Dunnett, Executive Officer, National Parks Association of NSW

Fire has played a central role in human history, an essential part of the tool kit that enabled a naked ape to spread across the globe. We are all linked by our individual experiences of fire, from an infant’s wonder to the shared pleasure of sitting around a campfire. Fire has influenced human history far beyond our individual experiences. In Australia, more so than anywhere else in the world, fire has shaped the landscape, vegetation communities and species. The arrival of humanity on this continent coincided with a sharp increase in fire frequency and a broad trend towards more fire tolerant vegetation types.

Smokescreen

Ian Brown, Environmental consultant and former national park manager (6 December 2019)

Note: an earlier version of this article first appeared in the Colong Bulletin no. 277, December 2019

As I write (on 6 December), fires in the north and south of the Blue Mountains are merging into mega-fires, driven by severe dryness, strong winds and parched air. Forty per cent of the million-hectare Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area has burnt so far. Millions of people are smothering in smoke. North-eastern NSW has already seen devastation. The NSW toll stands at six lives, more than 500 houses and over two million hectares. Already. Numerous wilderness areas and conservation reserves have been impacted, with many national parks burnt completely. Key koala populations have been decimated and ancient rainforests burnt (at least their edges and at ground level). There is no doubt this is the biggest fire season in the recorded (white) history of the state. And it will get worse before it rains.

Blue Mountains World Heritage and Bushfire

Roger Lembit, Ecologist

The National Parks of the Blue Mountains, which form the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, have been the site of extensive and unprecedented bushfires, which have raised concern internationally about the status of these parks.

Launch of the Great Koala National Park Information and Visitor Centre

Kevin Evans, Interim President NPA Coffs Coast Branch

The Great Koala National Park has been one of NPA’s priority campaigns for the last 6 years. The idea was born at the Bellingen Environment Centre (BEC) as their logical local response to the Koala Crisis. NPA and BEC stalwart Ashley Love, helped identify 175,000 hectares of State Forest that would be added to existing protected areas in the Coffs Harbour Hinterland to form a new 315,000 Great Koala National Park. At that point these forests were thought to be home for 20% of the NSW Koala population.

Australia’s National Parks by Public Transport

Book Review. Author: Mick Ogrizek, 2019

At last, a guide for the keen bushwalker who doesn’t have access to a car.

Mick Ogrizek explains the impetus for this book was his post-retirement goal to visit all the national parks of Australia. It was a goal hampered by the lack of a driver’s licence. The book is a result of research on how to visit those National Parks that are accessible by public transport. It is a work in progress, with the book covering 38 national parks across all eight states and territories.

Snowy 2.0 is not part of the climate solution – in fact it will add to the problem

Ted Woodley, Hon Treasurer of the NSW National Parks Association. Former Chief Executive in the energy industry including PowerNet, GasNet, EnergyAustralia and CLP Power Systems (Hong Kong). 

After the recent bushfire apocalypse, the stark realisation that our planet is suffering and our climate is changing more rapidly than anyone had envisaged has spurred numerous knee-jerk ‘solutions’ to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.  One such ‘solution’ being touted is the Snowy 2.0 pumped hydro project.