We’ll guaran-tree you’ll have a good time at Harrington Forest Frolic

Appreciate Western Sydney’s unique bushland at the ‘Harrington Forest Frolic’ next month.

You are invited to the ‘Harrington Forest Frolic’ on Saturday, 16th June from 9-12.30pm, a free and fun event celebrating local wildlife at Harrington Forest.

Illawarra Escarpment Landholders ask, “Who’s living on my land?”

 

Have you ever wondered what wildlife gets up to on your property? The National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) is helping private landholders answer the question “Who’s living on my land?” using infrared cameras to survey their land for wildlife.

The Wild Wild Inner West

Margot Law, NPA Citizen Science Officer

Imagine a city where native animals flourish, helping to control feral vermin and even looking after your garden! Well, perhaps Sydney isn’t that far away from making this a reality. In recent years, we’ve seen native species like long-nosed bandicoots (Perameles nasuta), powerful owls (Ninox strenua) and native pollinators starting to reclaim their city.

Glenfield locals putting the ‘Buzz’ back in the Cumberland Plain Woodland

The National Parks Association of NSW and Campbelltown City Council are launching a community bushcare group at Atlantic Boulevard Reserve and are calling for volunteers!

500 landholders ask – ‘Who’s living on my land?’

Margot Law, Citizen Science Officer National Parks Association of NSW

NPA’s “Who’s living on my land?” is an innovative citizen science project that helps regional private landholders discover what species are on their property. We have trained more than 500 landholders, at 32 regional workshops over the last three and a half years, to survey their land for wildlife with infrared cameras, which we loan out to participants.

The Dragons Among Us

Contributed by: James Baxter-Gilbert (PhD Student from Macquarie University, NSW)

The Australian Water dragon (Intellagama lesueurii) is a large lizard species common along the eastern coast of Australian ranging from Queensland to Victoria. There are two subspecies described: the Eastern Water Dragon (Intellagama lesueurii lesueurii) living in the northern extent of the range, and the Gippsland Water Dragon (Intellagama lesueurii howittii) living in the south1.  The males of this species are larger in size and will defend a territory, displaying a bright red chest coupled with head-bobbing and arm-waving to communicate to other males to stay away. Females will regularly mate with multiple males to ensure genetic diversity of her eggs; a single clutch of eggs may have 2-3 different fathers2 divided between 6-18 eggs.