Don’t swap World Heritage for a motorway

Sydney is the envy of millions of urban dwellers around the world who can only dream of living in a city with such spectacular natural beauty. The National Parks fringing the city—Ku-ring-gai, Blue Mountains and Royal—are an integral part of Sydney’s beauty and attractiveness, and a vital haven for Sydneysiders to escape the hustle and bustle of urban life.

Royal & Yellowstone — The World’s First National Parks

Janine Kitson, Member of the National Parks Association of NSW

Based on the NPA course presented to the WEA, Sydney on 4 March, 2017. With special thanks to Robert Crombie, Sutherland Shire Environment Centre.

In 1879 NSW led the world by establishing Royal National Park – then known as ‘The National Park’. This was Australia’s first official national park and one of the first national parks in the world. The first national park in the world was Yellowstone, created in 1872. Sydney’s National Park was renamed ‘Royal National Park’ in 1955 in honour of Queen Elizabeth II’s 1954 Australian tour.

Barrington Tops National Park

Featured National Park

Roger Lembit, Convenor, NPA’s Park Management Committee

Barrington Tops National Park and State Conservation Area make up an area of about 83,000 ha of reserved land. Additional forested land is managed by the Forestry Corporation, including Stewarts Brook, Barrington Tops, Bowman and Chichester State Forests. There are strong vegetated links northwards towards Nundle and Nowendoc around the head of the Manning River catchment.

Yarriabini National Park

Featured National Park

Brian Everingham, President Southern Sydney Branch, National Parks Association of NSW
You will find Yarriabini National Park a short distance south of Macksville or, if travelling from further south, roughly 45 km from Kempsey. Turn into Albert Drive at Warrell Creek and follow the signs for ‘Yarrahapinni Mountain’ or ‘Yarriabini National Park’. This is the beloved backyard of one of the great members of NPA, James Tedder, now deceased. This patch of land lies to the east of his home at Grassy Head and it is him and other local conservationists that we can thank for the protection, gazettal and effective management of this land. Mind you, Jim would also add that the park is not yet complete. We know he wished for the lands north of The Pines picnic area and along Way Way Creek Road to be added to the park and, perhaps, one day we shall see his wish fulfilled.

Leave No Trace

Leave No Trace

Dr Helen Smith, Activitives Officer, National Parks Association of NSW

Nothing is more heartbreaking than seeing natural areas trashed by current and previous visitors. Particularly when we all work so hard to protect natural places through our campaigns at the NPA. But protecting natural areas isn’t just about being loud through media coverage and campaigns. It also comes down to setting a good example to others when we’re out exploring.

We know we’re preaching to the converted here, but it’s worth refreshing the Leave No Trace Principles so you can clearly articulate them and their importance to others. Leave No Trace Australia is an organisation dedicated to inspiring and promoting responsible use of the outdoors through research, partnerships and education. The Leave No Trace guidelines describe best practice for visiting natural areas. They consist of seven principles:

Adventure World Racing Championships 2016

Bob Sneddon and Tony Hill, NPA members and former members of the South Coast Regional Advisory Council

In November 2016 Adventure Racing World Championships were held in South Coast Region national parks including Morton National Park and Budawang Wilderness.  Ninety-eight teams of four members made their way from one destination to another by foot and on bicycles along formed and unformed tracks that were chosen by their navigators as the fastest route.

Events such as this, especially when held in declared Wilderness Areas, are contrary to the intent and legality of the plans of management for these areas. The Act is specific: national parks and wilderness are for “appropriate” recreation.