Submission Guide Snowy 2.0 Transmission Connection

The NSW Government has exhibited an Environmental Impact Statement to build massive transmission towers through Kosciuszko National Park. The proposed ‘overhead’ connection links the new Snowy 2.0 powerstation with the electrical grid. 

The National Parks Association of NSW is demanding that the Snowy 2.0 connection should be by underground cables rather than on overhead lines.  Underground cables have far lower environmental impacts, are less vulnerable to fires and storms, are recognised as international best practice for environmentally sensitive sites, and avoid setting a terrible precedent for future connections through our precious national parks. 

This guide will assist everyone who cares about the future of Kosciuszko National Park to make a submission demanding an underground connection for Snowy 2.0


SUBMISSIONS CLOSE: Easter Monday 5/4/2021

The EIS for the Snowy 2.0 Transmission Connection can be viewed at https://www.planningportal.nsw.gov.au/major-projects/project/10591
We recommend using the Planning Department Major Projects  online form to make your submission.  You’ll need to create an account with the NSW Department of Planning to be allowed to make a submission.  
If you have any problems please email your written submission to Sharniec@npansw.org.au before the closing date and we’ll ensure it is forwarded to the NSW Department of Planning


It is always best to make a submission in your own words.  You can be as specific or as general as you like, and remember there is no need to be an expert to offer a comment.  Issues you might like to address include:

  • State your connection to Kosciuszko National Park, whether as a visitor, bushwalker, camper, climber, cross country skier or someone passionate about the environment. 
  • Describe how the destruction of this part of Kosciuszko National Park will impact your visitation and spending in the local area. 
  • Note that our collective responsibility is to protect National Parks for future generations, not for the commercial advantage of electricity companies. 
  • State your strong objection to any new overhead transmission lines through national parks, including Kosciuszko National Park. 
  • Note that the last major transmission line to be constructed in a NSW National Park was in the 1970’s, more than half a century ago.  
  • Overhead transmission lines are no longer acceptable in environmentally sensitive locations such as national parks.  Underground cables have less impact, last longer and are a far better option.
  • Since 2006, the Kosciuszko National Park Plan of Management (POM) has required that any additional transmission lines in the Park be located underground. 
  • It is outrageous that the NSW Government is looking to overturn this very reasonable policy so that TransGrid and Snowy Hydro Corporation can use a cheaper, outmoded and environmentally destructive option, ie. overhead lines.   
  • The proposed overhead lines are far more visually intrusive than any of the existing single-circuit lines in the Park, with two sets of  massive 75-metre-high towers traversing eight kilometres of Kosciuszko over a cleared  swathe up to 200 metres wide. The towers and lines will be visible over an astonishing 250 square kilometres of wilderness. 
  • One square kilometre of national park will be permanently cleared, decimating the habitat of threatened species such as Yellow bellied glider, Squirrel Glider, Eastern Pygmy Possum, Gang Gang Cockatoo, Powerful Owl, Masked Owl and the Boorolong Frog.  
  • If such species aren’t safe in a national park where can they possibly survive?
  • The Environmental Impact Statement is totally inadequate and should be withdrawn. If resubmitted it should propose an underground connection, in compliance with the POM and in keeping with world-best practice. 
  • If the EIS is approved this NSW Government will be the first to condone overhead  transmission lines in a National Park for 50 years – a tragic legacy, especially when there are viable underground alternatives.
  • Kosciuszko National Park is already under incredible stress from the bushfires which decimated much of the park in 2019-20, to the advancing effects of climate change. This area is already extremely fragile and cannot afford further destruction. Overhead transmission lines are completely unnecessary and inflict totally unnecessary permanent damage to our beloved Kosciuszko National Park.

Protections for Kosciuszko National Park stripped away for Snowy 2.0

The National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) has expressed outrage that the NSW Government plans to overturn the Plan of Management for Kosciuszko National Park.  A newly exhibited amendment to the Plan of Management exempts Snowy 2.0 from the legal requirement that new electricity transmission circuits must be placed underground rather than on environmentally damaging overhead towers1.

The Snowy 2.0 electricity connection must go underground

Twenty four organisations and fifty expert engineers, scientists, environmentalists, academics and economists, are calling on Planning Minister Rob Stokes and Environment Minister Matt Kean to avoid further damage to Kosciuszko National Park by putting the electricity transmission connection for Snowy 2.0 underground.

UoW plant trees to offset carbon

A group of University of Wollongong staff and students will visit the Berry area on 20 October to plant over 500 native trees as part of an ongoing initiative to reduce their carbon footprint.

The group will help to complete a 1.1km wildlife corridor planting along parts of Coolangatta and Moeyan Roads which is on NSW Sport & Recreation managed land south of Berry.

The idea of university staff and students offsetting carbon was generated by Associate Professor Owen Price, Director at the Centre for Environmental Risk Management of Bushfire at the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Life Sciences at the University of Wollongong.

Although Covid-19 has dramatically reduce air travel since March this year, university staff often fly to attend conferences and for research related reasons so planting trees is one way to help offset the carbon from all that flying.

Dr Price contacted David Rush, Bush Connect Project Manager and Land for Wildlife Regional Assessor for the Illawarra Shoalhaven region to connect the staff and students with potential tree planting projects on the coast.

“Planting native trees, shrubs and groundcovers is a great way to offset carbon, but it is also critical for creating corridors for native wildlife”, said David.

“For over one hundred and fifty years our native forests have been cleared, fragmented and lost and we have numerous native animals species that are now listed as threatened or endangered plus several vegetation communities that are also threatened”, added David.

“Projects like the Berry Bush Links and Thin Green Line are planting vegetation corridors for native animals such as the Glossy Black Cockatoo, to name just one of the many animal species that benefit from these projects.

Although a range of different species are to be planted for a range of native animals, we are also planting a number of Casuarina species which provide food for these beautiful cockatoos”.

The tree planting activity will be a Covid-19 safe activity with attendees providing their own tools, gloves, food and water and will be keeping their distance from each other during the planting.

“This is an excellent way for people to give something back to the environment which is being hammered by the impacts of climate change, bushfires and rural development pressures.

The Bush Connect projects also provide funding for landowners to help reduce invasive weeds, plant trees, control feral animals and study native animals.

Landowners that would like to get involved or learn more about the projects which are funded by the NSW Environmental Trust can call David on 0418 977 402 or email: davidr@npansw.org.au.

Experts confirm Snowy 2.0 is an economic dud and environmental disaster

New revelations confirm that Snowy 2.0 is an environmental and economic disaster. The NSW and Commonwealth were warned that the Business Case for the massive industrial development in Kosciuszko National Park was flawed. Today thirty-seven eminent Australian energy, engineering, economic and environmental experts have shown how emerging information confirms that Snowy 2.0 should never have been approved and, if constructed, will be a $10 billion White Elephant.